Church Farm Ardeley

A Free Range Experience


Leave a comment

Why Our Work is Important to Us

There is nothing that Rural Care isn’t involved in at Church Farm, we keep ourselves busy with anything from picking flowers for the shop to hanging a new door in the pub. Our days are diverse and filled with purpose, which is how we like them! Some of the roles we embark on at the farm offer us more than you may think and benefit us as much as the farm.

We offer opportunities for a diverse range of individuals, all of whom have their own interests, strengths, skills and abilities. We are able to tailor a day where everyone is involved in their own way.

This newsletter this was published in has been contributed to by Co-Farmer Holly, then folded by some of the students in our group from Greenside school, some of them have been hand delivered by Co-Farmers who like a walk and are learning about being safe in the community.

newsletter snip

 

Here are how some of our bigger responsibilities on the farm benefit us and the farm as a whole.

Laying hens
The laying hens offer us routine, which is important to some people.  The job is relatively predictable, there are many tasks involved in completing the job, and everyone finds their role. Harley loves to scatter the food. Luke enjoys collecting the eggs.  Daniel likes to get stuck in mucking out and Sean health checks the hens. Each with our own role, we work as a team and there is a sense of satisfaction and achievement at the end of the session. That then leads onto processing the eggs.  Some people like sorting over a chat about what happened on Eastenders. Florence likes to grade the eggs. Matthew is a keen egg boxer.  Many of the eggs you have purchased from the farm might have been boxed by Matthew. There is a wonderful cycle to chickens and eggs.  We all play our part and the result is our lovely fresh, free range eggs for sale in the shop. All of our Co-Farmers in some way have been involved in the journey those eggs have made to get there. Those eggs for sale in the shop offer us independence skills, confidence, social skills, numeracy and writing skills and a sense that we are part of something that people appreciate.

IMG_0715

Sheep
Sheep are wonderful creatures for us to work with, they are relatively safe, very sensory and are a great platform for us to learn about behaviour, body language, spatial awareness, teamwork and communication. Again, as with the hens, there is a cycle to working with sheep. Their cycle is over a year and starts with the rams being put with the ewes (tupping). Throughout the year there are then numerous tasks such as foot trimming, shearing, lambing and worming. These become part of our own cycle. We know it is spring when the lambs come and we know it is summer when we shear. To work with sheep you have to be aware of their signs and signals, what they are telling us. This can teach us a lot about behaviour, observation and team building.

IMG_1185

Allotment
Rural Care has their own allotment garden.  The idea behind the garden was to grow food for the Co-Farmers to cook with. Each spring the Co-Farmers choose what they would like to grow based on what they like to eat. Throughout the spring and summer the Co-Farmers tend to the fruit and veg they have sown. This again offers many different tasks which altogether result in the fabulous produce they harvest at the end of the summer and early autumn.  Then comes my favourite part, the cooking, as we learn how to turn that variety of veg into something yummy. Again there is an annual cycle that is predictable, the tasks change with the seasons and there is a great reward and sense of achievement at harvest time.

IMG_2361

Our work is so important to us. It’s not just about getting a job done it’s about finding out people’s interests, strengths and abilities and matching them to a wide range of tasks that together make up the farming that we do.

Rozelle

 

 

 


Leave a comment

A Free Range Internship Experience at Church Farm

Coming to Church Farm as an intern was probably one of the best decisions I made in the last year. Right at my first days at the farm I fell in love with the beautiful surroundings, the lovely animals and my most favourite spot at Church Farm, the Orchard. Coming here is not just a working experience, but an experience going though school of life. I had the great opportunity to work in many different departments at the farm such as the Café, the Shop and Events, Horticulture and Rural Care, what brought my week not just a good mix but constant confusion for my five different bosses. It gave me the chance to work with so many different and interesting people and do so many things I’ve never done before in my life.

Judith with apple

I learned hundreds of worlds and expressions (“jiggery-pokery” is one of my favourites), how to carry three plates at a time, and I got an introduction into English cooking and baking, learned how to best pick up a chicken to pet it, that parsnips love the spot where they grew and are not happy to leave it (muscle power is required) and that the most important thing about packing 300 orders of Christmas meat is concentration and therefore no music or singing – a bit of whistling is ok though. 😉 I’ve been driving on the wrong side of the road, changed gears with my left hand and learned the game sh**head which turned out to be one of my favourite card games, as long as I’m not the “Scheißkopf.” This list would go beyond the size of this page, but every day was different.

Judith pruning

All these experiences and many more are combined with special moments I shared with people at the farm. People I did not just work, but also live with, for six months, what is not always easy going, but part of the Church Farm Experience. I want to thank Tim for giving me this opportunity and all the people working, volunteering and visiting the farm—you make it the place it is. I will never forget these very special six months I spent here, all the good, the bad, the happy moments and memories, and all the people I had the pleasure to meet.

A unique experience at a unique place!

Judith, 26, Tyrol, Austria

 

 


Leave a comment

Carrot Cake

Laura - carrot cake 2017

One of our Co-Farmers has been working in the Church Farm Café kitchen on Thursdays.  She especially enjoys making carrot cake and would like to share her recipe:

Carrot Cake

2 tsp cinnamon
300g self-raising flour
1 tsp baking powder
200g soft brown sugar
4 eggs
250 ml vegetable oil
200g grated carrot

Mix all ingredients and bake at 180° for about 40 minutes. Top with your favourite icing, maybe cream cheese.

 

 

Church Farm Shop

Leave a comment

Have you visited the farm shop lately? There are some changes afoot.  We know that what our customers want from a farm shop is to have unique local produce. With this in mind we are extending the range of products that are produced here on the farm.

As well as being busy cooking breakfasts and baking cakes, our café kitchen is also used to produce the food that we sell in the shop.  For several years we have produced a range of jams and chutneys, all made with Church Farm fruit and vegetables.  There are very few farm shops doing this.  Beware the mass produced jams which are overprinted with a farm shop’s name.  We also produce a range of ready meals which can be cooked straight from the freezer.  Unlike the frozen meals sold in many farm shops, ours are made in small batches in exactly the same way that you would in your kitchen at home.  You cannot get closer to a home cooked meal without the effort of doing it yourself.  We are now extending the range to include a number of desserts.  We have chosen traditional recipes including rhubarb crumble and bread and butter pudding, all enough for two to share.

We are also now selling a range of soups.  Again made in our kitchen using Church Farm vegetables.  These are for sale alongside our homemade sausage rolls and scotch eggs with plans to extend our range of homemade deli items available over the summer.

So whether you are local or a day visitor we hope that you will take home a real taste of the farm and something that you cannot get anywhere else.

Su

 

This gallery contains 5 photos


Leave a comment

Lamb Feeding and other Spring Activities

Preparations are underway for the first birth of the year.  The lambing bays have been laid with fresh straw and the ewes are moving into the maternity ward as we speak.

lambs

New intern, Angelina, has arrived from North Rhine-Westfalia in Germany to work in Rural Care and lead the lamb feeding team.  Angelina is studying sustainable agriculture at the University of Applied Science, after WWOOFing in New Zealand three years ago sparked her interest in agriculture.  She will be with us through August.

20170303_143643(0)

Our first lambs are due mid-March. If you would like to meet our hand reared lambs and help us bottle feed them you can book online . Bottle-feeding is £9.95 per person, supervising adults are free. A lamb feeding session will typically last 45 minutes.  You will hear from our experienced staff the latest details about how the lambing is progressing and how special this time of year is on our farm. This activity is wonderful for all ages and everyone can get involved. Bottle-feeding lambs is a wheelchair and pushchair friendly activity.

Booking is essential as this is a popular event.  Please check-in at the Farm Store on arrival.

Name the Lambs Competition20170302_131825
Pick up an activity sheet from the farm shop when you get your Farm Day Pass and animal feed, and follow the Farm Trail around, past rabbits, goats, sheep, pigs, chickens and cows.  Along the way there are six painted lambs.  See if you can find them all!  Write down their names and go back to the shop for a prize.

Chick Trail for Easter
During the Easter holidays, pick up an activity sheet from the farm shop when you get your Farm Day Pass and animal feed, and follow the Farm Trail around, past rabbits, goats, sheep, pigs, chickens and cows.  Along the way there are painted chicks.  See if you can find them all!  Write down their names and go back to the shop for a prize.

Egg Collecting
We offer Little Farmers the chance to help with feeding chickens and collecting eggs from our happy Church Farm hens.  Egg collecting is at 11:30 am and lasts approximately 1 hour. Plus, as part of the experience, they’ll get to take half a dozen eggs home with them—eggcellent! You can book online. If you have any questions please call 01438 861 447. Egg collecting is £9.95 per child (this price includes the half dozen eggs and a bag of animal feed), free for supervising adults.

Farm Day Pass
A Farm Day Pass enables you to enjoy access to the farm trail, horticulture garden, woodland play area, home field and vicarage field animals and use of the indoor play room for just £3 per person or just £10 for up to 5 adults and children. Bags of pig, poultry and cattle feed are available at the Farm Store, where you will be given a safety briefing and a free map showing the points where you can feed the animals around the farm.

 

daffs

 


Leave a comment

Wildlife at Church Farm

Hertfordshire National History Society is inviting participation in a new wildlife survey.  According to their website, “The last organised county survey was started in 1970, and resulted in the publication of Michael Clark’s book, Mammals, Amphibians and Reptiles of Hertfordshire, in 2001. “  This is a joint project and the team also includes the County Mammal Recorder, University of Hertfordshire, Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust, Hertfordshire Environmental Records Centre, and the Herts Amphibian and Reptile Group.  The website details how residents can also get involved and submit data for the survey.  On the Mammal Atlas Page you can see the data recorded so far.

On the 14 and 15 May 2016, licenced surveyors undertook a survey of the wildlife at Church Farm for this project.  Using five traps for small mammals, and observation, the surveyors recorded:

Common Shrew (10)
Wood mouse (9)
Badger (4)
Field Vole (1)
Pygmy Shrew (1)
Bank Vole (1)
Great Crested Newt (1)
Smooth Newt (1)
Fox (1)
Grey Squirrel (1)

At Church Farm it is important to us to farm in a way that enhances the beauty of the countryside and the conservation of wildlife. We have 5 badger sets on the farm as well as barn owls and red kites living next door. Furthermore, last spring, a group of ornithologists spotted over 30 different species in a morning. For five years in a row now the grey partridges have successfully bred and the local wildfowl population is booming.

The idea of an ecological approach to farming is to have intimate diversity of all species. At times we have hosted bat walks this year, as the farm is alive with bats at night. All of this is down to providing hedges, beetle banks, new woodlands, wildflower mixes, pollen and wild bird seed strips.

—Aimee

 

References:
http://hnhs.org/article/mammals-reptiles-and-amphibians-new-countywide-survey
http://mammal-atlas.hnhs.org/

 


Leave a comment

Scanning Day for Ewes

Scanning day is always a big day here at Church Farm, the ewes are scanned using a mobile ultrasound  machine. They are marked with colours to indicate how many lambs they are carrying, blue is 1 lamb, red is 2 and orange is 3, an orange line on the top of the head is empty. With anticipation we gather the girls for the big scan.  It’s a tense moment when the first one goes through, and this year the girls were not behaving and avoiding the scanning crate at all costs. We eventually got the first batch through, but with all the commotion I missed the first 20 or so. As things started to flow I looked over at the ewes that have been scanned and can just see a sea of orange. My heart sinks, I immediately think they are all empty, our worst nightmare. I look again only to realise they are all triplets, and the panic sets in again!! 15 sets of triplets.

img_0418

Overall we are due 149 lambs, with 48 sets of twins and 15 sets of triplets, and the rest singles. A busy spring is ahead of us, but we can’t wait for this magical time of year,  looks like we chose the right Rams for the job!

img_0472

If you would like to join us for this special time of year we are running several experience days from family days to overnight experiences. If you have ever been interested in lambing this might be the perfect opportunity to tick something off the bucket list!

2016_0403_chfmlambs_0311

With the 15 sets of triplets we are expecting we will have an awful lot of extra mouths to feed this year and will be offering bottle feeding session from the 25th March.

2016_0403_chfmlambs_0121

Please visit our website for further details or to book one of the lambing experience days or bottle feeding lambs, places are limited so get booking quick!

Rozelle